Supporting Information on Lower-Level Programs 2015-16

 
 

Sub-Program 1.1.1: Aerospace

Description

This sub-program advances product and process technologies to enhance the prosperity of the aerospace industry sector in Canada that is striving to remain competitive in the face of razor-thin margins and increasing regulatory demands. The sector is important to the Canadian economy as a major contributor to manufacturing trade and for hundreds of thousands of skilled jobs at all levels of the supply chain. It is also important for its impacts on the transportation costs of materials and products that drive the economy. Results are achieved through multi-disciplinary collaborative research and development services in addition to specialized technical services in specialized facilities, such as testing and prototyping, for transferring or advancing technologies into deployed solutions and improved practices for the marketplace.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015‑16
Planned Spending
2015‑16
Actual Spending
2015‑16
Difference (actual minus planned)
51,777,378 58,448,085 6,670,707
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015‑16
Planned
2015‑16
Actual
2015‑16
Difference (actual minus planned)
296.0 371.1 75.1
 
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Advancements of aerospace process and product technologies Client/stakeholder financial investment in technology development, $ millions $36.5M annually by March 2016 $31.2M Table 3 note 1
Licensing and royalty revenue from NRC clients, $ millions $0.05M annually by March 2016 $0.35K Table 3 note 2

Table notes

Table 3 note 1

The Aerospace sub-program experienced a slightly lower than expected client engagement in some research areas mostly due to a large client experiencing unforeseen budget reductions.

Return to Table 3 note 1 referrer

Table 3 note 2

The Aerospace sub-program experienced lower than expected uptake.

Return to Table 3 note 2 referrer

 

Sub-Program 1.1.2: Automotive and Surface Transportation (AST)

Description

This sub-program provides technical knowledge and it advances product and process technologies for producing more fuel-efficient, affordable, and environmentally-responsible ground vehicles and for delivering engineering solutions to complex technology challenges facing surface transport industries including heavy vehicle and rail. This is important for reducing transportation infrastructure and costs and for enhancing Canada's share of ground vehicle supply chains and for enhancing the prosperity of the ground vehicle industry sector in Canada as it is faced with growing environmental concerns, competitive pressures, and stringent regulations. The Canadian economy relies on ground vehicle industries as major economic drivers, accounting for a significant portion of manufacturing trade, and therefore must remain competitive. Results are achieved through multi-disciplinary collaborative research and development services in addition to specialized technical services, such as testing, prototyping and system integration, for transferring or advancing technologies into deployed solutions and improved practices for the marketplace.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015‑16
Planned Spending
2015‑16
Actual Spending
2015‑16
Difference (actual minus planned)
38,254,232 42,496,741 4,242,509
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015‑16
Planned
2015‑16
Actual
2015‑16
Difference (actual minus planned)
214.0 253.3 39.3
 
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Advancements in ground vehicle process and product technologies Client/stakeholder financial investment in technology development, $ millions $25.8M annually by March 2016 $25.5M
Licensing and royalty revenue from NRC clients, $ millions $0.50M annually by March 2016 $0.84M
 

Sub-Program 1.1.3: Ocean, Coastal, and River Engineering (OCRE)

Description

This sub-program develops and advances technologies and standards for safe and effective operations in Canada's vast ocean, coastal and river environments, including the Arctic. This is important for lowering barriers for natural resource development and for enhancing the prosperity of the Canadian marine transportation and water resource sectors facing costly challenges of harsh environments (ice, wind, waves, currents), extreme weather events (floods, "100 year wave"), and coastal erosion. Results are achieved by working with Canadian industry through multi-disciplinary collaborative research and development services in addition to specialized technical services, such as testing, prototyping, numerical modeling, and system integration in specialized facilities, for transferring or advancing technologies into deployed solutions and improved practices for the marketplace.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015‑16
Planned Spending
2015‑16
Actual Spending
2015‑16
Difference (actual minus planned)
14,201,471 18,843,448 4,641,977
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015‑16
Planned
2015‑16
Actual
2015‑16
Difference (actual minus planned)
94.0 101.5 7.5
 
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Advancements of process and product technologies for ocean, coastal and inland water engineering Client/stakeholder financial investment in technology development, $ millions $13.6M annually by March 2016 $8.3M Table 9note 1
Licensing and royalty revenue from NRC clients, $ millions Under development Table 9 note 2 $0.11M

Table notes

Table 9 note 1

Many historical clients for NRC's services in this area come from the oil and gas sector. Thus, the oil and gas market slowdown negatively impacted the ability of clients to financially collaborate with NRC.

Return to Table 9 note 1 referrer

Table 9 note 2

As indicated in the 2015-16 Report on Plans and Priorities, a licensing and royalty revenue target will be set when full complement of baseline data has been collected and analysed as agreements are established.

Return to Table 9 note 2 referrer

Sub-Program 1.1.4: Energy, Mining and Environment (EME)

Description

This sub-program develops and advances technologies and techniques for enhancing the innovation capacity and growth of Canada's natural resources and utility sectors. These sectors are important contributors to Canada's GDP that are challenged by volatile global markets and growing environmental pressures. To remain sustainable, industries in these sectors require technologies to reduce production costs. Results are achieved through multi-disciplinary collaborative research and development services in addition to specialized advisory and technical services for transferring or advancing technologies into industrial solutions for the marketplace.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015‑16
Planned Spending
2015‑16
Actual Spending
2015‑16
Difference (actual minus planned)
22,048,883 26,701,401 4,652,518
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015‑16
Planned
2015‑16
Actual
2015‑16
Difference (actual minus planned)
138.0 193.1 55.1
 
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual
Results
Advancements of process and product technologies for the natural resources and utility sectors Client/stakeholder financial investment in technology development, $ millions $8.0M annually by March 2016 $6.1M Table 12 note 1
Licensing and royalty revenue from NRC clients, $ millions $0.3M annually by March 2016 $0.13M

Table notes

Table 12 note 1

EME sub-program client investment was impacted by the global decline of commodity prices in the resource sector (including the oil and gas, and the mining sectors) affecting client needs and activities; some adjustments to activities were required in light of the market changes.

Return to Table 12 note 1 referrer

Sub-Program 1.1.5: Construction

Description

This sub-program provides technical knowledge and it advances product and process technologies to enhance the prosperity of the Canadian construction industry sector as it faces critical challenges in responding to expectations for better performing and more affordable buildings and infrastructure while striving to remain competitive in the global marketplace. The success of this sector is critical as a major contributor to Canada's GDP, employing millions of individuals, and managing assets valued in the trillions of dollars. Results are achieved through multi-disciplinary collaborative research and development and standardization services in addition to specialized technical services—such as testing, product and process validation, prototyping, and system integration in field and in specialized facilities—for transferring or advancing technologies into deployed solutions and improved practices for the marketplace.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015‑16
Planned Spending
2015‑16
Actual Spending
2015‑16
Difference (actual minus planned)
23,308,344 27,450,032 4,141,688
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015‑16
Planned
2015‑16
Actual
2015‑16
Difference (actual minus planned)
156.0 183.8 27.8
 
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Advancements of process and product technologies for the construction industry sector Client/stakeholder financial investment in technology development, $ millions $15.9M annually by March 2015 $17.5M
Licensing and royalty revenue from NRC clients, $ millions $0.32M annually by March 2016 $0.86M
 

Sub-Program 1.1.6: Aquatic and Crop Resource Development (ACRD)

Description

In collaboration with industry, this sub-program develops improved varieties of crops and develops technologies for maximizing crop value and converting biomass to enhance the prosperity and global market share of the Canadian agriculture, bio-product, and natural health product industry sectors. This includes development and validation of value-added goods – from natural ingredients and health products through to chemicals and industrial oils and other products – for leveraging Canada's abundance of aquatic and crop resources. Results are achieved through multi-disciplinary collaborative research and development services in addition to specialized technical services for transferring or advancing technologies into deployed solutions and improved practices for the marketplace.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015‑16
Planned Spending
2015‑16
Actual Spending
2015‑16
Difference (actual minus planned)
25,248,626 30,558,846 5,310,220
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015‑16
Planned
2015‑16
Actual
2015‑16
Difference (actual minus planned)
135.0 211.6 76.6
 
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Advancements in agricultural crops and related value-added products Client/stakeholder financial investment in technology development, $ millions $5.0M annually by March 2015 $6.2M
Licensing and royalty revenue from NRC clients, $ millions $0.30M annually by March 2016 $0.52M
 

Sub-Program 1.1.7: Medical Devices (MD)

Description

This sub-program applies expertise in biochips, nano-materials, micro-devices, in vitro diagnostics, imaging, optical bio-photonics, medical simulation, and radio-frequency engineering and electronics to develop and advance technologies for enhancing the prosperity of the medical device industry as it strives to respond to increasing demands for equipment and supplies that are faster, more accurate, more informative, more affordable and less invasive. The industry is important for its growing contribution to Canada's GDP and its contribution to effective and efficient health care. Results are achieved through provision of industry-driven technical services and multi-disciplinary collaborative research.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015‑16
Planned Spending
2015‑16
Actual Spending
2015‑16
Difference (actual minus planned)
8,996,650 10,095,479 1,098,829
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015‑16
Planned
2015‑16
Actual
2015‑16
Difference (actual minus planned)
51.0 65.0 14.0
 
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Advancements in medical devices for the marketplace Client/stakeholder financial investment in technology development, $ millions $3.2MTable 21 note 1 annually by March 2016 $3.1M
Licensing and royalty revenue from NRC clients, $ millions $0.20M annually by March 2016 $0.34M
 

Table notes

Table 21 note 1

Based on a full year's operation of the Health Technologies program, which was not officially launched until half way through the year.

Return to Table 21 note 1 referrer

Sub-Program 1.1.8: Human Health Therapeutics (HHT)

Description

In collaboration with industry, this sub-program develops vaccines and biologics for enhancing the prosperity of the Canadian bio-therapeutics industry, and to provide more effective treatments to Canadians. Activities include developing biologic materials for treating and preventing infectious and chronic diseases, and technologies to deliver therapeutics from circulation in the blood to the central nervous system. Results are achieved through multi-disciplinary collaborative research and development services in addition to specialized technical services for transferring or advancing technologies into deployed solutions and improved practices for the marketplace.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015‑16
Planned Spending
2015‑16
Actual Spending
2015‑16
Difference (actual minus planned)
37,586,916 47,144,947 9,558,031
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015‑16
Planned
2015‑16
Actual
2015‑16
Difference (actual minus planned)
224.0 302.0 78.0
 
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Improved and more affordable vaccines and biologics for the marketplace Client/stakeholder financial investment in technology development, $ millions $13.2M annually by March 2016 $19.3M
Licensing and royalty revenue from NRC clients, $ millions $3.3M annually by March 2016 $4.7M
 

Sub-Program 1.1.9: Information and Communication Technologies (ICT)

Description

In support of Canada's digital economy, this sub-program applies leading-edge expertise in software development, semiconducting materials and photonic device design and fabrication to design, validate, demonstrate and deliver both physical and software solutions that lead to new market opportunities for industries in Canada's information and communication technology (ICT) sector that seek to profit from an explosive growth of data and from escalating needs for greater connectivity and for revolutionary ways to use computers to make decisions, synthesize information, and discover new knowledge. This is important for increasing Canada's global share of the growing ICT market. Results are achieved through multi-disciplinary collaborative research and development services in addition to specialized technical services in state-of-the-art facilities for transferring or advancing technologies into deployed solutions and improved practices for the marketplace. This includes custom manufacturing of novel components for innovative photonic, electronic, and opto-electronic devices.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015‑16
Planned Spending
2015‑16
Actual Spending
2015‑16
Difference (actual minus planned)
32,346,442 38,598,891 6,252,449
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015‑16
Planned
2015‑16
Actual
2015‑16
Difference (actual minus planned)
147.0 218.0 71.0
 
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Advancements of process and product technologies for the information and communications technology sectors Client/stakeholder financial investment in technology development, $ millions $10M annually by March 2016 $15.4M
Licensing and royalty revenue from NRC clients, $ millions $0.40M annually by March 2016 $0.49M
 

1.1.10: Security and Disruptive Technologies (SDT)

Description

This sub-program builds and validates emerging technology platforms (such as nanotechnology, quantum technologies and the convergence of nano-, bio- and information technologies) that can be applied in a range of industries to sustain Canada's industrial competitiveness by opening new markets and value networks for Canadian industries in tomorrow's economy. Efforts focus on applications for addressing national security challenges because security and defence innovation players are amongst the earliest adopters of such technologies from which broader commercial adaptations ultimately evolve, replacing existing technologies. Results are achieved through multi-disciplinary collaborative research and development services in addition to specialized technical services in state-of-the-art facilities for ultimately introducing disruptive and transformational technology solutions into practice and the marketplace.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015‑16
Planned Spending
2015‑16
Actual Spending
2015‑16
Difference (actual minus planned)
19,511,329 26,492,641 6,981,312
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015‑16
Planned
2015‑16
Actual
2015‑16
Difference (actual minus planned)
114.0 156.0 42.0
 
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Advancement of process and product technologies in security and other industry sectors Client/stakeholder financial investment in technology development, $ millions $3.95M annually by March 2016 $3.86M
Licensing and royalty revenue from NRC clients, $ millions $0.12M annually by March 2016 $0.24M
 

Sub-Program 2.1.1: National Science Infrastructure (NSI)

Description

This sub-program manages Canada's astronomical observatories as mandated in the National Research Council Act, and it compiles and disseminates astronomical data while leveraging access to international observatories for Canadian researchers in astrophysics. This sub-program uses funding from the following transfer payment: Contributions to the International Astronomical Observatories Program.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) Table 31 note 1
2015‑16
Planned Spending
2015‑16
Actual Spending
2015‑16
Difference (actual minus planned)
53,225,039 89,307,915.00 36,082,876.00
 

Table notes

Table 31 note 1

Includes spending for TRIUMF. The result highlights associated with TRIUMF can be found in the Supplementary Tables.

Return to Table 31 note 1 referrer

Human Resources (FTEs)
2015‑16
Planned
2015‑16
Actual
2015‑16
Difference (actual minus planned)
114.0 117.8 3.8
 
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Canadian scientists have access to astronomical observatories and data User access and downloads of astronomy data 4000 annually by March 2016 7000
Scientific publications by telescope users 300 annually by March 2016 501
 

Sub-Program 2.1.2: Measurement Science and Standards (MSS)

Description

As mandated under the National Research Council Act and also the Weights and Measures Act, this sub-program investigates and determines standards and methods of measurement for Canada's national measurement system. This national metrological system is critical for underpinning trade and commerce in the global economy. The sub-program supports international metrological treaties and arrangements to establish and maintain foreign recognition and acceptance of Canada's standards and measures that are critical for participation in multi-lateral and free-trade agreements. The sub-program provides a wide variety of calibration and measurement services that underpin the accuracy of millions of measurements conducted annually in public and private sector testing and calibration laboratories. In addition, the sub-program provides expert assessments and formal recognition of the measurement capabilities of industrial calibration laboratories. This is important for providing Canada's trading partners confidence in the reliability of Canadian industries' measurements and test certifications of compliance to regulatory and product standards that govern trade. The sub-program also develops measurement standards for emerging technologies that open new global market opportunities for Canadian industries.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015‑16
Planned Spending
2015‑16
Actual Spending
2015‑16
Difference (actual minus planned)
25,043,259 27,071,771 2,028,512
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015‑16
Planned Spending
2015‑16
Actual
2015‑16
Difference(actual minus planned)
153.0 159.4 6.4
 
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Internationally-recognized national system of measurement that meets Canada's evolving needs. Clients served 725 annually by March 2016 826
International recognition of calibration and measurement capabilities 600 annually by March 2016 621 calibration and measurement capabilities recognized by formal international agreement
Scientific and other publications in metrology 1500 annually by March 2016 3221