Departmental Results Report 2017-2018 - Supplementary information tables

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Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

Context for the Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

The 2016–2019 Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS):

  • sets out the Government of Canada’s sustainable development priorities
  • establishes goals and targets
  • identifies actions to achieve them, as required by the Federal Sustainable Development Act

in keeping with the objectives of the Act to make environmental decision-making more transparent and accountable to Parliament, NRC supports reporting on the implementation of the FSDS and its Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy, or equivalent document, through the activities described in this supplementary information table.

Sustainable Development in NRC

NRC’s Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy for 2017 to 2020 describes NRC’s actions in support of achieving the FSDS goal of low-carbon government. This supplementary information table presents available results for NRC’s actions pertinent to this goal. Last year’s supplementary information table is posted on NRC’s website.

In addition to Green Procurement, the NRC will share energy and emission data with the Treasury Board Secretariat Centre for Greening Government, and NRC will develop a strategy to meet the target of 40% reduction in emissions.

Departmental performance highlights

FSDS target: Reduce greenhouse gas emissions from federal government buildings and fleets by 40% below 2005 levels by 2030, with an aspiration to achieve it by 2025

FSDS contributing action: Support the transition to a low-carbon economy through green procurement

FSDS goal: low-carbon government
Corresponding departmental actions Support for UN Sustainable Development Goal target Starting point(s), target(s) and performance indicator(s) for departmental actions Results achieved
Procurement officers are required to take green procurement training. 12.7 Percent of procurement officers who have received green procurement training:
Baseline = 100% on March 31, 2017
Target = 100% by March 31, 2018
100%
Maintenance contract proposals require proponents to include green considerations as part of their services. 12.7 Percent of janitorial, snow removal and major maintenance contracts having green considerations:
Baseline = 80% on March 31, 2017
Target = 90% by March 31, 2018
86%

Report on integrating sustainable development

During the 2017–18 reporting cycle, NRC completed no proposals that required a Strategic Environmental Assessment for which a public statement was produced.

Details on transfer payment programs of $5 million or more

International Astronomical Observatories Program

General information

Name of transfer payment program International Astronomical Observatories Program
Start date 1978
End date Ongoing
Type of transfer payment Contribution
Type of appropriation Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2015-16
Strategic Outcome SO 2. R&D Infrastructure for an innovative and knowledge-based economy
Link to department’s Program Alignment Architecture Sub-Program 2.1.1: National Science Infrastructure
Description

Astronomy has become a global science. The increasing cost of leading-edge observatories and the scarcity of ideal observation sites have led to a greater focus on international collaboration for large-scale astronomy projects which lead to advances in our knowledge and understanding of the universe.

NRC, in collaboration with other international bodies, provides financial contributions to support the management and operations of offshore ground-based observatories and their related facilities, including the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), the twin telescopes of the Gemini Observatory and the Atacama Large Millimetre/sub-millimetre Array (ALMA). NRC participates in the oversight and direction of these facilities and their research capabilities. NRC also represents Canada in the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) consortium for the pre-construction phase of the telescope. In 2015, Canada joined the international partnership to participate in the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT). NRC, on behalf of Canada, provides both financial and in-kind contributions.

International agreements governing these observatories are long-term commitments that specify contributions to support preconstruction design and development, construction, operation and maintenance, capital improvements (e.g., development of new astronomical instruments and other facility upgrades) and decommissioning of the international ground-based observatories and their related facilities. In addition, they include commitments to support the university-based user communities to ensure a fair and progressive use of these observatories. NRC participates in the governance of these international facilities on behalf of the Canadian astronomy research community and provides appropriate support, including sophisticated data management services and instrumentation. Through NRC’s financial and in-kind contributions, the Canadian astronomy community is assured merit-based access to these facilities with appropriate support.

Recipients are not required to repay funds obtained under this transfer payment program.

Results achieved
  • The Canadian Astronomy Data Centre (CADC) delivered 170 million files to users (a 50% increase over 2016), 1593 Terabytes of files to approximately 11,000 astronomers. The number of registered users (not all of whom downloaded data) was approximately 8000 in 2017.
  • The CADC completed a joint project with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the European Space Agency (ESA) to unify the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) archive services. This merging of the archive service reduces the staffing burden needed to support the HST archive and prepares the CADC for its role as one of three mirror sites for the James Webb Space Telescope that is expected to be launched in 2021.
  • 443 scientific papers were published by users based on data obtained using the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) and the Gemini Observatory. 335 scientific papers were published based on data obtained using the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) Observatory.
  • Demand by astronomers for telescope access continued to exceed the time available by a factor ranging from 2.6 to 7.9, depending on the telescope. This is as a reliable indicator of the relevance of the observatory and of its instrumentation.
  • $3.0M in service contracts were signed with industry partners in support of astronomy technology R&D activities.
  • The Honourable Kristy Duncan, Minister of Science and of Sport and Persons with Disabilities, inaugurated Canada’s newest and largest radio telescope: the CHIME (Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment) telescope, located at the NRC’s unique Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory (DRAO) site in Penticton, BC. This telescope will allow scientists to measure the expansion of the universe over the period between 7 and 11 billion years ago. Those measurements are expected to explain the properties of dark energy, a poorly-understood source of pressure that is thought to prevent the universe from collapsing under the force of gravity.
Comments on variances The significant variance of $77,706,320 between the planned spending of $96,334,149 and actual spending of $21,903,992 is due primarily to project delays associated with Canada's participation in the construction of the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) that are outside NRC's control. As a result, NRC has re-profiled $76,114,850 of its 2017-18 funding related with Canada's contribution to the TMT to 2018-19.
Audits completed or planned N/A
Evaluations completed or planned Evaluation completed in 2016-17.Evaluation of NRC Herzberg Astronomy and Astrophysics (HAA) Portfolio
Engagement of applicants and recipients NRC manages observatories established or maintained by the Government of Canada for the benefit of the Canadian astronomy research community, aligning its contributions to the priorities of the community's Long Range Plan for Astronomy and Astrophysics. NRC participates on the Boards that oversee the observatories to ensure that the science directions and programs of the facilities reflect Canadian strengths and interests. In addition, NRC ensures that these activities increase opportunities for Canadian researchers and firms to develop relevant instrumentation for the observatories. To carry out its roles effectively, NRC provides current information about each observatory to research community-based committees of scientists, which provide expert advice on observatory operations and development. NRC provides extensive support to the user community through numerous services extending from administering the time allocation process for Canadian researchers through to delivery of science-ready data (through its Canadian Astronomy Data Centre).

Performance information (dollars)

Type of Transfer Payment 2015-16
Actual
spending
2016–17 Actual
spending
2017-18 Planned
spending
2017-18 Total
authorities available for use
2017-18 Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance (2017-18 actual minus 2017-18 planned)
Total grants - - - - - -
Total contributions 15,406,533 20,991,704 99,610,312 100,734,149 21,903,992 (77,706,320)
Total other types of transfer payments - - - - - -
Total program 15,406,533 20,991,704 99,610,312 100,734,149 21,903,992 (77,706,320)

TRIUMF

General information

Name of transfer payment program TRIUMF(voted)
Start date 1977
End date Ongoing
Type of transfer payment Contribution
Type of appropriation Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2014-15
Strategic Outcome SO 2: R&D Infrastructure for an innovative and knowledge-based economy
Link to department’s Program Alignment Architecture Sub-Program 2.1: Science Infrastructure and Measurement
Description

TRIUMF is Canada's particle accelerator centre. The laboratory is one of Canada's key investments in large-scale research infrastructure. It provides world-class facilities for research in sub-atomic physics, accelerator science, life sciences, and materials science. A consortium of 20 Canadian universities (13 full members and 7 associate members) owns and operates TRIUMF. TRIUMF receives the majority of its federal operating funding through NRC in five-year allocations via a Contribution Agreement. NRC plays an important oversight and stewardship role for TRIUMF on behalf of the Government of Canada. Recipients are not required to repay funds obtained under this transfer payment program.

Results achieved

World-class science and advancement of the ARIEL facility.

  • TRIUMF contributed to the publication of 307 manuscripts in scientific journals to advance science and Canada’s reputation on the world stage.
  • TRIUMF remained on schedule for completing construction of ARIEL by 2023. This new infrastructure will allow for the simultaneous operation of multiple experiments, opening new frontiers in science, medicine and business.
  • TRIUMF participated in an international collaboration that demonstrated the first ultra-cold neutrons in Canada, achieving a major milestone in understanding fundamental physics measurement including contributing to solving the puzzle of why there is much more matter than antimatter in the universe.

New and retained talent, and continued support for international research collaborations and partnerships.

  • TRIUMF hosted 875 scientific visitors, students, and users (of which 506 came from international institutions).
  • TRIUMF trained 251 highly qualified personnel, including undergraduate and graduate students, and post-doctoral researchers.

Increased industry and community linkages for increasing the economic and societal benefit delivered to Canada.

  • TRIUMF transferred new technology to ARTMS Products for producing a critical medical isotope by enabling its production using hospital-based medical cyclotrons, instead of nuclear reactors. The Canadian spinoff company has commercialized this technology globally. ARTMS received a 2017 BC Technology Association Award for the Most Promising Pre-Commercial Technology.
  • TRIUMF's commercialization arm helped secure venture capital funding for two spin-off companies: ARTMS Products and CRM GeoTomography to commercialize technology for production of medical isotopes.

Enhanced operational efficiency

  • TRIUMF launched a new Project Management Office to improve project governance and strengthen the overall resource planning across all projects in the laboratory.
  • TRIUMF established weekly management safety walkthroughs and initiated efforts to optimize space utilization and improve work processes.
  • TRIUMF recruited a Chief Operating Officer to improve operational efficiency.
  • The laboratory also carried out a comprehensive safety culture assessment led by an independent expert, which ultimately found a mature safety culture in place.
Comments on variances No variances
Audits completed or planned Not applicable
Evaluations completed or planned Evaluation completed in 2013-14. Evaluation of NRC's Contribution to TRIUMF. The next evaluation is scheduled for 2018-19.
Engagement of applicants and recipients

NRC provides stewardship to TRIUMF, administering operational funding to the facility and monitoring all matters pertaining to the contribution agreement with the facility. Oversight of TRIUMF operations is provided by the Advisory Committee on TRIUMF (ACOT) which reports to NRC and the Agency Committee on TRIUMF (ACT), comprised of the federal funders of TRIUMF.

The Advisory Committee on TRIUMF (ACOT) is composed of international experts within disciplines that cover the research and technology activities of TRIUMF. ACOT reports its findings to NRC twice annually, making recommendations on management issues as well as reporting on the scientific and technological achievements of TRIUMF. Representatives of the National Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC), the Canadian Institute of Nuclear Physics and the Canadian Institute of Particle Physics are observer members who ensure that TRIUMF's directions are aligned with the research community's needs and that TRIUMF is working with all constituencies of the Canadian sub-atomic physics community.

NRC maintains an ex officio presence on TRIUMF’s Board of Management and on TRIUMF’s Audit Committee. Dialogue is maintained between NRC and the recipient to ensure that investments made by the Government of Canada are optimal, and that NRC meets the needs of its recipient as well as providing a vehicle for feedback on the transfer payment management process.

As a magnet for young minds, TRIUMF has designed numerous programs aimed at young people, students, teachers and the general public, to ensure that as many as possible benefit from the scientific program and the excitement that exists within one of Canada's premier laboratories.

 

Further information is available from the TRIUMF website at www.TRIUMF.ca.

Performance information (dollars)

Type of Transfer Payment 2015-16
Actual
spending
2016–17 Actual
spending
2017-18 Planned
spending
2017-18 Total
authorities available for use
2017-18 Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance (2017-18 actual minus 2017-18 planned)
Total grants - - - - - -
Total contributions 50,832,000 53,672,000 54,572,800 54,572,800 54,572,800 0
Total other types of transfer payments - - - - - -
Total program 50,832,000 53,672,000 54,572,800 54,572,800 54,572,800 0

Industrial Research Assistance Program (IRAP)

General information

Name of transfer payment program Industrial Research Assistance Program (voted)
Start date 1965
End date Ongoing
Type of transfer payment Contribution
Type of appropriation Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2012-13
Strategic Outcome SO1: Canadian businesses prosper from innovative technologies
Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture Program 1.2: Industrial Research Assistance Program
Description

The Program contributes to the growth and prosperity of Canadian small and-medium sized enterprises (SMEs) by stimulating innovation, adoption and/or commercialization of technology-based products, services, or processes in Canada. This is done through: 1) technical and related business advice and networking facilitated by a cross-Canada network of field professional staff; 2) cost-shared merit-based contributions; and 3) contributions supporting employment of post-secondary graduates. This Program uses funding from the following transfer payments: Contributions to Firms; Contributions to Organizations; and Youth Employment Program (YEP).

NRC IRAP supports the placement of graduates in SMEs through its participation in the delivery of YEP sponsored by Employment and Social Development Canada's Youth Employment Strategy (YES).

Recipients are not required to repay funds obtained under this transfer payment program.

Results achieved Results are described in detail under Program 1.2 Industrial Research Assistance Program in NRC's 2017-18 Departmental Results Report.
Comments on variances There is a $15,680,519 variance between the planned spending of $176,644,000 and actual spending of $192,324,519. This variance is mainly due to two budget increases received during the fiscal year; $10,000,000 for Youth Green contributions that was announced in Budget 2016-17 and; a transfer from Employment and Social Development Canada to the Youth Employment Strategy Career Focus Program in the amount of $10,000,000. This is offset by a several unrealized opportunities including $2,500,000 in deferred recruiting to Youth Green due to late receipt of funding during the fiscal year.
Audits completed or planned Audit completed in 2016-17. Audit of Industrial Research Assistance Program (IRAP) - SONAR
Evaluations completed or planned An evaluation of IRAP was completed in 2017-18. The next evaluation is planned to be completed in 2022-23.
Engagement of applicants and recipients

NRC IRAP is a national program managed on a regional basis with over 240 Industrial Technology Advisors (ITAs) located in approximately 100 communities across the country, who provide customized advice to technologically innovative small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). ITAs are engaged with client SMEs throughout the entire contribution management process, from building project proposals through to project completion.

At the end of their funded project, recipients are required to complete an online Post-Project Report. This assessment captures information on the recipient's experience with NRC IRAP and, along with published service standards, is used by the program to develop continuous program improvements.

NRC IRAP has an Advisory Board composed of 10 to 12 members from the industry sector and industry associations. This Board provides advice to NRC IRAP management and brings an external perspective on the strategic directions and management of the program.

NRC IRAP is actively engaged with Treasury Board Secretariat Grants and Contributions Reform. Participation in workshops and constant alignment with recent Treasury Board Secretariat policy and guidelines has enabled the program to steadily move toward principles such as a Recipient Engagement Strategy.

 

Performance information (dollars)

Type of Transfer Payment 2015-16
Actual
spending
2016–17 Actual
spending
2017-18 Planned
spending
2017-18 Total
authorities available for use
2017-18 Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance (2017-18 actual minus 2017-18 planned)
Total grants - - - - - -
Total contributions 205,299,766 242,922,833 176,644,000 196,644,000 192,314,017 15,670,017
Total other types of transfer payments - - - - - -
Total program 205,299,766 242,922,833 176,644,000 196,644,000 192,314,017 15,670,017

Canada Accelerator and Incubator Program (CAIP)

General information

Name of transfer payment program Canada Accelerator and Incubator Program (CAIP)
Start date 2013-10-01
End date 2019-03-31
Type of transfer payment Contribution
Type of appropriation Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2013-14
Strategic Outcome SO1: Canadian businesses prosper from innovative technologies
Link to department’s Program Alignment Architecture Program 1.2: Industrial Research Assistance Program
Description The CAIP is a 5-year non-repayable contribution program, aimed at establishing a critical mass of outstanding business incubators and accelerators that can develop innovative, high-growth firms, which themselves represent superior early-stage investment opportunities. The program was structured by Finance Canada and has been delivered by NRC through IRAP.
Results achieved

CAIP funding is expected to contribute to:

  • An expanded range of programs and services by funded accelerators and incubators
  • Increased investment readiness of early stage firms
  • Benefits to early stage firms from innovation support resources such as expertise and networks
  • Wealth creation in Canada

In 2016, a formative evaluation, focusing on design and delivery was conducted. IRAP implemented the evaluation recommendation to strengthen program delivery. A summative evaluation, which assesses the extent to which the program has achieved expected results is currently underway and will be completed by December 2018.

Comments on variances The variance of ($2,069,594) between the planned spending and actual spending is within accepted tolerances.
Audits completed or planned None
Evaluations completed or planned

A formative evaluation was completed in 2016-17.
A summative evaluation is planned for 2018-19.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

CAIP supports SMEs' access to best-in-class business accelerators and incubators with the goal of helping these organizations expand their overall service offerings. Organizations were selected based on CAIP specific eligibility criteria and selection guidelines. CAIP is a direct result of extensive consultations, undertaken by Finance Canada in 2012, which revealed that, in addition to the availability of venture capital, entrepreneurs also require access to specialized innovation resources to succeed.

Performance information (dollars)

Type of Transfer Payment 2015-16
Actual
spending
2016–17 Actual
spending
2017-18 Planned
spending
2017-18 Total
authorities available for use
2017-18 Actual
spending (authorities used)
sVariance (2017-18 actual minus 2017-18 planned)
Total grants - - - - - -
Total contributions 18,198,272 24,341,747 24,565,885 24,565,885 23,967,946 (597,939)
Total other types of transfer payments - - - - - -
Total program 18,198,272 24,341,747 24,565,885 24,565,885 23,967,946 (597,939)

Evaluations

Evaluations completed, or planned to be completed, in 2017–18

Title of evaluation Link to department’s programs Status Deputy head approval date
Evaluation of the Industrial Research Assistance Program Industrial Research Assistance Program Completed June 2017
Evaluation of NRC Security and Disruptive Technologies Sub-program Technology Development and Advancement Program Completed December 2017
Evaluation of NRC Digital Technologies Information and Communication Technologies Sub-program Completed August 2018Table 9 note 1
Evaluation of NRC Energy, Mining and Environment Sub-program Technology Development and Advancement Program Completed July 2018Table 9 note 2
Evaluation of the Canadian Accelerator Incubator Program Industrial Research Assistance Program In Progress December 2018 (Planned)
Evaluation of NRC’s Contribution to TRIUMF National Science Infrastructure Program In Progress March 2019 (Planned)

Fees

Owing to legislative changes, the fees results for the NRC are available in the 2017 to 2018 Fees Report.

Horizontal initiatives

General information

Name of horizontal initiative Genomics R&D Initiative (GRDI)
Lead departments National Research Council Canada (NRC)
Federal partner departments Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC), Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA), Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO), Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC), Health Canada (HC), National Research Council Canada (NRC), Natural Resources Canada (NRCan), Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC). Canadian Institutes for Health Research (CIHR) received a onetime allocation in 1999-2000.
Non-federal and non-governmental partners Not applicable
Start date of the horizontal initiative April 1999, renewed in 2002-03, 2005-06, 2011-12, and 2014-15
End date of the horizontal initiative March 2019
Description of the horizontal initiative GRDI supports genomics research inside federal government laboratories. It focuses on mandates and priorities of participating departments and agencies. Research covers areas such as health care, food safety and global food security, sound management of natural resources, a sustainable and competitive agriculture sector, and environmental protection, with collaboration with university and private sectors. Since the implementation of the GRDI in 1999, participating departments and agencies have built a solid genomics research capacity and have gone a long way to deliver on the Initiative's stated objectives, as confirmed by three independent evaluations (2006, 2011, and 2016) and an audit by the Office of the Comptroller General (2012). Additional information may be found on the GRDI website.
Governance structures

An interdepartmental Assistant Deputy Minister (ADM) Coordinating Committee (CC) oversees collective management and coordination of GRDI. It is responsible for the overall strategic direction for the GRDI and approval of investment priorities.

An Interdepartmental Working Group (WG) supports the work of the committee. It is chaired by the lead agency (NRC) with membership at the Director level from all participating departments/agencies, and Industry Canada. The WG provides recommendations and strategic advice to the ADM CC regarding strategic priority setting and overall management of the GRDI.

A Coordination Function, housed at NRC, provides GRDI-wide program coordination, communication, networking and outreach support.

Total federal funding allocated (start to end date) (dollars) 393,300,000
Total federal planned spending to date (dollars) 373,400,000
Total federal actual spending to date (dollars) 372,014,090
Date of last renewal of the horizontal initiative 2014
Total federal funding allocated at the last renewal, and source of funding (dollars) $99,500,000 for 2014 to 2019;
Source: Fiscal Framework
Additional federal funding received after the last renewal (dollars) Not applicable
Funding contributed by non-federal and non-governmental partners Not applicable
Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation 2021-22
Shared outcome of federal partners The GRDI Horizontal Performance Measurement Strategy was updated for Phase VI. The updated version covers fiscal years 2014-2015 to 2018-2019 and formalizes the roles and responsibilities of the eight departments and agencies involved in the Initiative to support effective monitoring and evaluation activities. It presents three intermediate outcomes:
  1. Federal science departments and agencies are positioned as genomics research leaders;
  2. Research results are used to inform government regulatory, policy, and/or resource management decisions; and
  3. Research results are used by stakeholders to support innovation in Canada; contributing to the Government of Canada Outcomes: Healthy Canadians; Strong economic growth; An innovative and knowledge-based economy; and A clean and healthy environment.
Performance indicators GDRI is managed using a comprehensive performance measurement framework to gauge progress towards the above 3 shared outcomes. Examples of performance indicators include:
  1. Scientific production and impact in genomics
  2. Case analysis of examples where risk assessment, regulatory, policy, and resource management decisions have been informed by GRDI research (federal, provincial, municipal)
  3. Case analysis of examples where innovative tools and processes have been adopted in Canada based upon GRDI research
Targets Targets for the above examples are:

Indicator 1: On par or better than other genomics researchers in Canada

Indicator 2 and 3: Positive impact based on qualitative case study analysis

Data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting The data for the above examples is derived from program Evaluation every 5 years
Results See results, below.
Expected outcome or result of non-federal and non-governmental partners Not applicable
Name of theme Not applicable
Performance highlights Fiscal 2017–2018 marked the fourth year of Phase VI of the GRDI. The initiative continued to support government genomics research in collaboration with universities, other government levels, and the private sector. It funded 64 research projects within participating departments, including two highly coordinated interdepartmental shared priority projects: the Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) and Metagenomics Based Ecosystem Biomonitoring (EcoBiomics) projects. Examples of achievements this year include:
  • an analytical tool that predicts antimicrobial resistance phenotypes and the mechanisms of resistance transmission, that provides risk modellers and policy-makers enhanced capacity to assess the risk of the spread of antibiotic resistance genes;
  • standardized sampling, nucleic acid extraction, and metagenomics workflows across agencies for the analysis of over 2,300 soil, water, and invertebrate samples collected from across Canada for DNA sequencing. This work will facilitate standardized monitoring of soil and freshwater quality to ensure we deliver evidence-based environmental management and resource development decisions;
  • enhanced capacity for the timely detection and identification of microbiological food safety hazards, animal pathogens, plant pests, invasive plants, and plants with novel traits, to support government regulatory actions;
  • validated cutting-edge environmental DNA (eDNA) tools to support Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) regulatory decisions;
  • assembled genome sequence of Stettler, a popular Canadian wheat variety, for the study of diseases, pests, abiotic stresses and developmental pathways in wheat;
  • guidance for the use of genomics in regulatory toxicology, including a guidance project adopted as official guidance for Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) member countries;
  • a large repository of in vivo gene expression data related to in vivo toxicity of engineered nanomaterials; researchers in Europe are now using the repository to frame evidence-based research and regulatory questions;
  • a new online database and analytical platform that enables investigation of Neisseria meningitidis epidemiology and outbreaks at the local level; and
  • a national database containing the spectra of rare and under-represented bacterial pathogens, providing fast, accurate and cost-effective identification of those pathogens locally rather than through a reference centre.
Contact information Roman Szumski
Vice-President, Life Sciences
National Research Council Canada
(613) 993-9244

Further information is available from the GRDI website at http://grdi-irdg.collaboration.gc.ca/eng/index.html

Performance information
Federal departments Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture or Program inventory Horizontal initiative activities Total federal allocation (from start to end date) (dollars) 2017‑18 Planned spending (dollars) 2017‑18 Actual spending (dollars) 2017‑18 Expected results 2017‑18 Performance indicators 2017‑18 TargetsFootnote * 2017‑18 Actual results
AAFC (Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada) Science, Innovation, Adoption and Sustainability Canadian Crop Genomics Initiative (CCGI) 108,500,000 4,440,000 4,440,000 Footnote ER1 Footnote PI1 Footnote T1 Footnote AR1
Footnote ER2 Footnote T2 Footnote AR2
CFIA (Canadian Food Inspection Agency) Food Safety Program, Animal Health and Zoonotics Program, Plant Resources Program GRDI 3,600,000 720,000 720,000 Footnote ER3 Footnote PI3.1Footnote PI3.2 Footnote T3 Footnote AR3
DFO (FishFRies and Oceans Canada) Biotechnology and Genomics National Aquatic Biotechnology and Genomics R&D Strategy 16,495,000 720,000 708,800 Footnote ER4 Footnote PI4 Footnote T4 Footnote AR4
ECCC (Environment and Climate Change Canada) Climate Change and Clean Air Strategic Technology Applications of Genomics in the Environment (STAGE) 18,550,000 800,000 800,000 Footnote ER5 Footnote PI5 Footnote T5 Footnote AR5
HC (Health Canada) Canadian Health System Policy / Health System Priorities GRDI 53,123,617 105,904 203,620 Footnote ER6 Footnote PI6 Footnote T6 Footnote AR6

Health Products / Biologics & Radiopharmaceuticals

GRDI 2,136,042 528,601 529,223

Food Safety and Nutrition / Food Safety

GRDI 930,461 235,964 186,780

Environmental Risks to Health / Health Impacts of Chemicals

GRDI 2,909,880 729,531 710,600
NRC (National Research Council Canada) Technology Development and Advancement GRDI 108,500,000 4,440,000 4,440,000 Footnote ER1 Footnote PI1Footnote PI7.1Footnote PI7.2 Footnote T1 Footnote AR1
Footnote ER7 Footnote T7 Footnote AR7
Shared priorities 28,855,000 3,980,000 3,980,000 ER8 Footnote PI7.1Footnote PI7.2 Footnote T8 Footnote AR8
NRCan (Natural Resources Canada) Innovation for New Products and Processes GRDI 36,100,000 1,600,000 1,600,000 Footnote ER9 Footnote PI9.1Footnote PI9.2 Footnote T9 Footnote AR9
PHAC (Public Health Agency of Canada) Public Health Infrastructure GRDI 13,100,000 1,600,000 1,600,000 Footnote ER10 Footnote PI10.1Footnote PI10.2 Footnote T10.1Footnote T10.2 Footnote AR10.1Footnote AR10.2
CIHR (Canadian Institutes for Health Research) Not applicable Not applicable 500,000 0 0 Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable
Total Not applicable Not applicable 393,300,000 19,900,000 19,919,023 Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable
 

Internal audits

Internal audit engagements completed in 2017-18

Title of internal audit Completion date
Audit of Talent Management – Workforce Planning and Succession Management Completed in 2017-18
Audit of Industrial Research Assistance Program (IRAP) - SONAR information management system Completed in 2017-18

Response to parliamentary committees and external audits

Response to parliamentary committees

There were no parliamentary committee reports requiring a response in 2017–18.

Response to audits conducted by the Auditor General (including to the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development)

There were no audits in 2017–18 requiring a response.

Response to audits conducted by the Public Service Commission of Canada or the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages

There were no audits in 2017–18 requiring a response.